Privacy Vanishes: Government Snatches Cloud Data Easier Than Home Computer

Technology

Information uploaded to the World Wide Web, corporate servers, is much easier for the U.S. government to snatch than data stored on your home computer’s hard drive, thanks to an outdated 1986 federal law, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) – a law that is far behind current Internet, mobile phone and computing technology.

That’s because law enforcement needs a warrant to get their hands on your home computer hard drive, but not so with the new ubiquitous “cloud” computing on the Internet. In many cases, officials only need a district attorney’s subpoena (issued without judge approval) – and sometimes, the police don’t even need that, ABC News reports.

Now a diverse coalition has assembled to demand that Congress update the 1986 law to better protect individual consumer privacy. The coalition includes Google, Microsoft, AT&T, Intel, Americans for Tax Reform, ACLU, the American Library Association, the Competitive Enterprise Institute and the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

It’ll be interesting to see what Dick Cheney and the architects of the so-called “Patriot Act,” and even President Obama and the current political leaders, will have to say about strengthening Internet privacy laws in the U.S.

To be continued… “The Battle Against Big Brother.”

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4 comments
Indyposted
Indyposted

It’s not about hiding, it’s about protecting U.S. Citizens rights under improper search and seizure which correct me if I’m wrong (I’m not wrong) is protected under the U.S. Constitution. This work around claims cloud computing has no personal rights, it’s the equivalent of police breaking into your apartment and saying they have the right because your apartment is in a larger building you don’t own, and even though you occupy the space it’s not yours.

Indyposted
Indyposted

It’s not about hiding, it’s about protecting U.S. Citizens rights under improper search and seizure which correct me if I’m wrong (I’m not wrong) is protected under the U.S. Constitution. This work around claims cloud computing has no personal rights, it’s the equivalent of police breaking into your apartment and saying they have the right because your apartment is in a larger building you don’t own, and even though you occupy the space it’s not yours.

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