Manoj Patankar provides tips for disaster recovery

Featured News

Disaster reliefA CNN.com article says the United States simply isn’t ready for destructive superstorms, like that of Superstorm Sandy that devastated parts of the east coast in October. Manoj Patankar believes preparation and safety in action are all important to recovering from disasters.

Last October’s Superstorm Sandy was not the first storm to rock the United States in recent memory. The disastrous tornado in Joplin, Missouri as well as Hurricane Katrina’s impact on the gulf coast have a CNN.com article suggesting the United States is never well-enough prepared for the millions or billions of dollars of damage one of these storms can cause.

An overwhelming majority of scientists believe global warming is more fact than theory, so the time between these massive disasters may be getting shorter and shorter. While there is still much to be learned about the danger of these evolving storms, a few points can be taken as fact and need to be recognized in order to help in both preparation and recovery efforts.

First, water is much more dangerous and volatile than wind. Many news reports are concerned with the category of a hurricane and the wind speeds associated with that. Superstorm Sandy was a category one hurricane when it hit New Jersey, New York and Connecticut. But it wasn’t the damage from the wind that drove up nearly $82 billion in damages for those states, it was the surging water. The CNN.com article suggests changes need to be made sooner rather than later when concerning city designs and the layout and placement of important assets like transportation systems, waste management systems and power transformers.

Manoj Patankar believes individuals need to take more responsibility when it comes to disaster recovery. The first thing he suggests is being better prepared. A simple disaster kid of first-aid essentials, nonperishable foods and protective clothing can go a long way while waiting for help. Manoj Patankar says on a community level, disaster preparedness should include drilling its citizens regularly to ensure efficiency in case of emergency.

Manoj Patankar also says keeping a clear head during an emergency can be the difference between life and death. In bad situations, humans tend to panic and fail to process information correctly, he says. Every action made must be within the realm of acting toward recovering from the disaster. Anything else can only make the situation worse for those attempting to correct the problem.

The CNN.com article also states a need for institutionalizing learning from disasters. A team such as the National Transportation Safety Board is needed for responding to disasters. The NTSB typically has a team of specialists investigating and reporting on what happened just hours after an incident. This is huge step that’s missing in the field of disaster recovery.

A CNN.com article says the United States simply isn’t ready for destructive superstorms, like that of Superstorm Sandy that devastated parts of the east coast in October. Manoj Patankar believes preparation and safety in action are all important to recovering from disasters.

Last October’s Superstorm Sandy was not the first storm to rock the United States in recent memory. The disastrous tornado in Joplin, Missouri as well as Hurricane Katrina’s impact on the gulf coast have a CNN.com article suggesting the United States is never well-enough prepared for the millions or billions of dollars of damage one of these storms can cause.

An overwhelming majority of scientists believe global warming is more fact than theory, so the time between these massive disasters may be getting shorter and shorter. While there is still much to be learned about the danger of these evolving storms, a few points can be taken as fact and need to be recognized in order to help in both preparation and recovery efforts.

First, water is much more dangerous and volatile than wind. Many news reports are concerned with the category of a hurricane and the wind speeds associated with that. Superstorm Sandy was a category one hurricane when it hit New Jersey, New York and Connecticut. But it wasn’t the damage from the wind that drove up nearly $82 billion in damages for those states, it was the surging water. The CNN.com article suggests changes need to be made sooner rather than later when concerning city designs and the layout and placement of important assets like transportation systems, waste management systems and power transformers.

Manoj Patankar believes individuals need to take more responsibility when it comes to disaster recovery. The first thing he suggests is being better prepared. A simple disaster kid of first-aid essentials, nonperishable foods and protective clothing can go a long way while waiting for help. Manoj Patankar says on a community level, disaster preparedness should include drilling its citizens regularly to ensure efficiency in case of emergency.

Manoj Patankar also says keeping a clear head during an emergency can be the difference between life and death. In bad situations, humans tend to panic and fail to process information correctly, he says. Every action made must be within the realm of acting toward recovering from the disaster. Anything else can only make the situation worse for those attempting to correct the problem.

The CNN.com article also states a need for institutionalizing learning from disasters. A team such as the National Transportation Safety Board is needed for responding to disasters. The NTSB typically has a team of specialists investigating and reporting on what happened just hours after an incident. This is huge step that’s missing in the field of disaster recovery.

Manoj Patankar helped establish the Center for Sustainability at Saint Louis University, which is a part of an effort to lead a Sustainable Disaster Recovery Conference. 

Related Articles

0 comments

Back to Top

© Copyright 2014 —Indyposted.com. All Rights Reserved | Privacy Policy | Copyright Notice

Search